Crochet Tutorial: Better Late Than Never Beanie

One of my “go-to” hats for donations AND it’s great for using up left-over yarn! I got permission from the designer, Kathy North, to do a video tutorial and here it is!

(CLICK HERE for the LEFT HAND version.)

RIGHT HAND version:

Here’s a quick link to the original written pattern.

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3 thoughts on “Crochet Tutorial: Better Late Than Never Beanie

  1. Hi Margaret
    Thanks so much for all the work you put into sharing your knowledge with us. This question is about crochet hat construction in general.
    I was wondering, could you kindly publish ( perhaps you have already😉) a list of the various stitch types (sc, hdc, dc), and numbers of sts needed in first round, and how many incs to make in each round of the flat crown area, which is constant once started, I notice.
    This is because some hats say 8 per round, the better late than never one is twelve I think , perhaps because of the non incr rounds.
    So, is there a formula to do with the height of sts and the number in the first round, and the number of increases per subsequent round, if you get what I mean?
    By mistake I’ve just tried with 12 sc in first round and the ensuing flat disc wasn’t, it was wavy!
    Thank you so much!

    • Hi again. I’ve just read that and thought how demandingly bossy I sound. I am so sorry! What I meant to ask and say was that if you have noticed a trend in these stitch numbers, according to their height , would you be a wonder and share with us, pleeeze!
      I can’t help but think these things are connected, and that yarn and hook size will be irrelevant? What do you think?

      Sorry I was rude!
      Thanks

      • You didn’t sound bossy at all, Belinda! I loved your scientific thought process! You’re exactly right that all those observations DO factor into crochet, but a chart may not do you much good because of one other factor: GAUGE. If you crochet tighter or looser than I do, my info would be irrelevant. That’s why I always do my tutorials by measurement. (Did you see the hat sizing chart on this blog? https://sheepishlysharing.com/2017/01/23/hat-sizing-chart/ ) Now if you’re following a pattern and get a wavy flat circle, then your gauge is looser than the pattern designer and you should go down a hook size. One other thing that could further complicate matters is the weight of the yarn! Not all #4 worsted weights are alike! If the designer used Caron Simply Soft and you use Caron One Pound (both #4 worsted) you’re going to get different results because CSS is thinner than COP. Over time, you’ll learn what works best for you.

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